How to Live Through The Massive Global Shift of Power

Today’s Massive Global Shift of Power

The massive global shift of power now is seen in governments, and is moving through to our communities. Whole systems are being questioned and upended, and the upheaval can be jarring at the least. Like turning over huge rocks, much that has been living in the shadow is now seeing the light of day. It isn’t easy to look at, yet look we must look in order to identify the choices to be made for the changes needed.

We are in difficult times. National systems and structures are being challenged. Government leaders are being scrutinized. Life perspectives are being clarified.

Individually you may be experiencing fatigue or uneven energy, or you might be having unusual headaches. People are uncharacteristically erratic or inconsiderate. Clearly, life is not as it was and feels like it never will be again.

How to Live Through These Shifts

Most of us can most easily affect our own personal world and environments. In these global shifts, what is your vision for your life? What is your vision for the future?

I encourage each one of us to hold our highest vision, and to act with integrity and compassion toward its most peaceful fulfillment. Our future will be shaped by such choices and actions.

Change is not easy. It’s going to be uncomfortable at times, frustrating, and you may be tempted to stop and think you can let others do your work for you.

The truth is  – Only You Know what is in your heart ready to be seen and experienced.

I ask you: What is the particularly unique harvest you are so carefully tending in your life? What is your personal purpose for being on this planet at this time in humankind’s history? How can you help?

Your life is input for the world’s experience now and in the future. How do you want to shape that experience?

Bliss Dance on Treasure Island copyright Baylan Megino

Bliss Dance on Treasure Island copyright Baylan Megino

The Invitation

President Barack Obama, when talking about the United States’ participation in addressing climate change, said, “I believe the United States of America should be at the front of the pack. But even in the absence of American leadership; even as this Administration joins a small handful of nations that reject the future; I’m confident that our states, cities, and businesses will step up and do even more to lead the way, and help protect for future generations the one planet we’ve got.”

That is your invitation to take the future into your hands, to participate in making the world a better place for yourself and for all.

Time to Begin

Start small. Change can begin with baby steps. Remember, the future begins in each breath. Imbue yours with your highest vision, undying hope, and all-encompassing love. Then act from there.

Let us begin <3 <3 <3

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The Dream Maker in Winter

The Dream Maker in Winter is like the Bear – finishing the creation cycle by resting, gaining clarity in the dreamtime, gathering energy, and preparing for life in the spring.  Today I walked in my garden and was greeted by two very different things.

At the bottom of the stairs is my container garden. Right now it’s just pots of dormant orchid bulbs and succulents. We don’t get a regular hard frost here, so the succulents can survive winter without freezing.

Dream Maker Container Garden in Winter fb 02355 by Baylan Megino

Container Garden in Winter 02355 by Baylan Megino

These flowering plants do well in containers, providing beautiful flower spikes each year. They don’t require much tending, and only need to be in the filtered or light shade, away from the harsh bright light.

Their roots don’t need to spread wide and deep, and instead circle around inside the container before needing to be separated and cleaned.

If I go too long away from this contained garden, I sometimes miss the beautiful flowering branches of cymbidiums and have to wait another year to discover what color each plant will produce. And if I’m fortunate to see the flowers, I sometimes bring them indoors to be enjoyed, container and all.

February is the middle of winter and my garden is confused.
And that’s okay by me.

I look around the neighborhood and everyone’s front yard is so neat and nicely tended. The plantings have been strategically placed, and dog owners are careful to pull their pets away from lingering too long in one place.

And then there’s my home.

I grew up in gardens that were given free rein. My father annually pruned back rose stems and occasionally trimmed the fruit tree branches. He had areas kept neat for the vegetables, but a lot of the garden was allowed to spread unhindered.

So today the yellow flowers are growing wild, towering way above the 6” limit that the City prefers for “weeds.”  I enjoy the masses and mounds of clover-like leaves and the yellow cups floating above and closing at night.

Dream Maker: The Garden in February 2016 fb 02362 by Baylan Megino

The Garden in February 2016 fb 02362 by Baylan Megino

Beneath that green carpet I know there is dark, rich soil being nourished by green roots kept moist by the shade. I used to think of them as tiny shamrocks, in honor of my favorite Irish nun in 2nd grade.

They make me smile as they greet me when I come home each day. It is then that I take an audible cooling breath and gratefully exhale.

There’s even an area in front that sprouted some huge mushrooms that looked like shiitakes. They were attractive to some of the dogs, but someone promptly took them away one night.

My neighbors haven’t said anything to me, but I can hear the whispers in their minds as they walk by. Why don’t they keep those weeds under control? Cut that grass – it’s so long it’s bending down toward the earth! Those rose bushes should be cut back! That ivy and morning glory will invade the neighbor’s space – why aren’t they more considerate?

There is timing for everything as we make our dreams. In time, I will trim back the ivy and the morning glory vines.

In time the yellow flowers will finish their cycle and disappear. Then it will be easy to clear the space.

The grass… well, it’s just too close to the tiny shamrocks to cut without disturbing them. Grass will be cut in time.

I’m patient with my garden. And my garden is patient with me.

While I wait for the plants to finish their cycle, the fruit trees are going through theirs. Oranges are falling from the tree, and the apple and peach trees are preparing their leaves. I was told that one of the trees is a walnut — we’ll see if it decides to provide nuts this year. The brambleberries are silently preparing to bloom.

And so it is with life. In our winter season, we Dream Makers take time to go within and gather energy, to dream of what is next to be created.

There are so many choices. What is the fruit of our labor that we want to show the world? Which is The One for this next cycle?

What is the proper environment for them – pot or ground? Roots contained or free? How will we grow and get the fruits out to others to be consumed? Who do we want to enjoy the fruits of our labors?

How much effort are we willing to put forth toward harvest time? How much harvest do we want to reap?

And so it goes as we contemplate our dreams and plan to make them real.

The dream takes hold and sinks roots into the soil of our hearts,
fed as an expression of our deepest soul’s murmurings.

For the Dream Maker, each day the dream takes on more form. The harvest is chosen. The space makes way for the soil to be tilled, and the seeds to be planted. Remaining dead branches are pruned back so energy can be concentrated on new growth, new branches.

Our vision becomes clearer and we can see how the garden will look in the spring as the new leaves sprout. The dream takes shape as we imagine summer’s approach, perhaps already starting a second cycle that will grow alongside.

We see the profusion of green leaves waiting, preparing the way for the flowers and fruits to appear. We can feel the cycles of sunlight, moonlight, dew and rain.

We can feel the gentle breezes and insects doing their parts to spread the pollen and, when it’s time, share the seeds.

We have dreamed alive our bountiful garden — the garden nourishing us with beauty and oxygen and food and sacred space.

The Dream Maker sees all these things, and knows it all begins in the silence of winter.

 

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Blessings, light and peace,

Baylan

Gratitude Day 4: Fathers

On this 4th Day of Gratitude, I give thanks for my father, and all the fathers in the world.

Every day I walk by two places where my father’s watchful gaze is seen. Though he isn’t with us any longer, my memories are strong and inform my every interaction.

The Yang to Mother’s Yin

When I think of Dad, my memories are filled with how he showed up in the world – at home, at work, in the community, in organizations. Whether in public or in private quarters, my dad showed me how to interact one-on-one with whatever was in front of me.

Gratitude Day 4 Father by Baylan Megino

Gratitude Day 4 Father by Baylan Megino

Dads do that. They show us how to DO things – how to observe, analyze, plan and implement so that we can get the result we want.

They teach us how to think about our part in the whole. Sometimes we have to think of what is in the best interest of the greater good, and choose between our individual desires and what will be best “for all concerned.”

They show us the individual attitude needed to persevere in difficult times, as well as the way to step back and be part of a team while maintaining our individuality.

They also show us when to step aside.

It’s hard for me to write about being a dad.
I’ve never been a dad and never will be.

I can only share some of the images that I am grateful for that are indelibly etched in my memory:

  1. Watching Dad make a kite out of bamboo strips, then flying it in the Knights of Columbus kite-flying contest
  2. Fishing in the Ozarks and catching lots of bluegills
  3. His erect stance, with head slightly tilted, a smile curling up the edges of his mouth.
  4. His / My hands
  5. The way he called me “Girl” – only a handful of times
  6. Standing alone with him behind the church entry doors as the Love Theme from “Superman” began to play, he touched my arm, slightly raised his eyebrows, and gently asked, “Are you ready, girl?”
  7. His gentle touch
  8. His anger at injustice
  9. Playing chess after work with my aunt
  10. Wearing plumed hat, satin cape, and sword as Grand Knight and part of the Knights of Columbus Color Guard
  11. Dancing with all the widows and older single women, but Mom always had the last dance
  12. Baiting the hook and fishing at Berkeley Pier
  13. Smoking Kent cigarettes, the stick pursed between lips and tilted up so the ashes wouldn’t fall
  14. The glow of his cigarette in the dark as the trash mound burned
  15. Carrying Mom’s big camera case wherever they traveled
  16. Michelin Man
  17. Bowling with community groups
  18. Singing in the church choir
  19. Connecting with the land and its cycles at the almond orchard
  20. Planting green beans and tending to the garden every evening
  21. Opening envelopes by tearing off the end
  22. His joy on our first visit to the Philippines and pride in sharing his family
  23. Putting on the Igorot hat, squatting on the hillside and looking into the distance, cigarette held between his lips
  24. Fishing at Ocean Beach with the long ocean fishing poles
  25. Fishing derbies at Lake Chabot
  26. Dad with my cousin and his young male friends
  27. His willingness to try anything
  28. His mischievousness – climbing the statue at the St. Louis FANHS Convention
  29. Fixing the car
  30. Figuring out how to DO things
  31. Being

Like many, my relationship with my father was up and down. We were much alike, so eventually gave each other wide berth when needed. In those times, as now, those many memories gathered over the years kept us connected.

I am so very grateful for those memories. And for the man who made them and me possible.

Thank you, Dad.

Today, give thanks for your father. If you can, tell him. Even better, show him.

Blessings and peace,

Baylan

 

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Gratitude Day 3: Mother

On this third day of Gratitude, I give thanks for my Mother, and for all mothers in the world.

This morning as I woke up, sunlight was just peeking through the window. The house sildent, I heard my mother moving slowly in the next room.

Gratitude Day 3 Mother by Baylan Megino

Gratitude Day 3 Mother by Baylan Megino

How many times as an infant, I wondered, did I listen to her move through the rooms, the speed of her gait and volume of her sound communicating her feelings?

That is what mothers do. They are always present, whether physically or in our minds. They birth us, feed us, dress us, discipline us, tend to our every need. They teach us how to view and approach life, based on traditions, their experiences, and observations of the world. They shape our mental world and expectations, and guide our responses, defining right and wrong.

Even when we can provide for ourselves, mothers often still attempt to guide our thoughts.

It’s hard to stop being Mom.

Becoming a mother is a process sometimes eased by the shared wisdom from your own. It is in preparing to welcome your child that you understand the commitment required of a mother, a commitment made to ensure the continuation of life beyond our years.

A mother must give over her body to another being — for up to nine months she shares her breath, her blood, and her cells so that the baby can grow.,

She risks her health and her life in order that her child can come into the world. And once arrived, she must put many of her needs aside in order to focus on ensuring her child grows healthy, strong, and able to face the world in their own way.

As adults, our challenge is to remember to
keep in touch with our mothers,
even when life gets busy.

Especially when life gets busy.

As I get older, I’ve found that my mother has honed an uncanny intuition. Was she reading my mind before I even knew my thoughts?

At some point, the tables will turn, and children become caregivers for their parents. It is then that we must remember — EVERYTHING Mother did so that we could live, so we could thrive, so we could choose the path to walk and the life to live.

And in the toughest times, remember that someday, receiving care is where we shall each be. Hope that the care is given by someone who truly cares.

Giving gratitude for Mothers, and especially for My Mother. Thank you, Mom 🙂

Blessings, light and peace,

Baylan

 

 

 

Gratitude Day 1: Breath of Life

On this first Gratitude Day, I am grateful for that first breath taken at birth, the Breath of Life, and for every breath since then.

Gratitude Day 1 Breath by Baylan Megino

Gratitude Day 1 Breath by Baylan Megino

In the very first moment of life, we take a breath for the first time and struggle to fill our lungs with air. Taking this foreign element into our water-nourished bodies is our first physical struggle outside the womb.

With each succeeding inhalation, we infuse our cells, our muscles, and all our tissues, and we are able to become more alive in this outer world as a result. Then we exhale, only to take in the next breath.

Like a bellows, we fill and empty our lungs. Oxygen is distributed to all the right places. The lungs fill, the heart fills, and cells are alerted,

“Life Will Continue.”

Without that rhythmic inhale-exhale-inhale-exhale song, there would be no life. There would be no BE.

How we know to take that first breath, and to continue breathing — is a mystery.

When we take that first breath outside mother’s womb, we begin on the path of our own life — individual, private, alone. Yet the planet is surrounded with an abundance of air to breathe, an abundance of food to eat, materials for clothing, and places for shelter.

We could live this life alone, but we do not remain alone. At least in the beginning, we need others to feed us, to clothe us, to shelter us, and to show us how to BE in this world. That is the journey.

What compels us to take that first breath? And the second and the third and the four-hundred-millionth?

Perhaps it is an innate knowing that there is something out there. Perhaps it is an innate curiousity that leads us from moment to moment as we experience this physical realm.

Inhale. Exhale.
Inhale. Exhale.
Inhale. Exhale.

Before we know it, decades have passed and we are still standing, still breathing, still listening to our heart beat, however faintly.

So today let’s be grateful for the very basic and irreplaceable Breath of Life. It allows us to explore this adventure called Life as we create our own stories along the inhale-exhale journey. May it contine as long as our heart desires.

Blessings of light, abundance, and peace to you,

Baylan Megino