12 Days of Gratitude Day 3: Communication

On this 3rd day of Gratitude, I am grateful for the ability to Communicate – to receive communication from so many sources, and to be able to communicate my wants, needs, and feelings to others. Imagine what chaos and pain there would be in the world if we couldn’t effectively communicate.

When I walk around and pay attention, I notice so many different ways we receive communication. One way to look at it is through our senses.

12 Days of Gratitude 2017 Day 3 Communication by Baylan Megino

12 Days of Gratitude 2017 Day 3 Communication by Baylan Megino

Communication through Observation

It was liberating when I realized we receive communication visually in images, written words, and in observing the happenings around us. If you really think about this, then you might become overwhelmed with the sheer volume of communication we are bombarded with every day.

“How is observing a way of communication?” you may wonder. Well, what are the thoughts that come to mind as you walk through your day? If you are on a crowded sidewalk, what do you see? Perhaps you observe a woman holding a child’s hand. Why do you think you were drawn to notice that one particular visual, and not drawn to notice another person, or a different picture in a store window?

Communication with Higher Mind

In my way of navigating through the world, this is how we receive communication from our inner mind, our higher mind, our spirit guides, our angels. We notice things with the intention of receiving communication in any form. Then it is our job to interpret what we are receiving.

Sometimes we then need to determine if the message is for us, or for someone else we are in contact with. For those of us who are more sensitive to receiving messages, it is important to know when the communication is meant for you, or meant for another.

Communication through Words

Most of the time we communicate through words – this is a very direct and simple way to communicate. We convey the nuances of our expressed thoughts using verbal and written words. The only filter we contend with is our bias related to the particular words, and this bias can be far-reaching. This filter is culturally influenced, whether the culture is centered on ethnicity, geography, family, spiritual practice, sexual orientation, academic institution, etc.

When we become aware of our own biases, then we increase the potential to accurately receive the intended communication.

The Power of Words to Create

Words are thought energy shared. When a thought is shared, it can become a concrete thing through action. That very action shapes the experience of all those involved. So words are powerful because they have the potential of affecting others, the potential of catalyzing the creation of something – a thing, a situation, a relationship.

When you think about it, if you truly understand this concept, and harness that knowledge to create what you want, then you have the power of creation.

Communication through Actions

I remember being confused and frustrated one day because someone I cared about said one thing, and did another. I had begun to question my ability to understand what they wanted to communicate.

To help me understand, my best friend said, “It’s not what they say that is important. It’s what they do that tells you how they really feel.”

It's not what they say - It's what they do by BaylanMeginoIt makes sense. How many times have you heard someone agree to do something, and then turn around and do the opposite or something else? Their words didn’t match their actions. Consider that, for whatever reason, they did not want to say No. So if you know this mismatch is possible in a situation, then watch what they do. How do they Act? Actions communicate a wealth of information. But we’ll get into that with more depth another time.

We are all familiar with simple actions that communicate: “The Look” from mom, the tug on your hand or arm to stop you from walking onto a busy street, a hug, a gentle rub on your back, a smile. Actions communicate whether to move toward that person, or to head the other way. We’ve all learned how to interpret actions so that we know which way to go.

Communicate with Music

Music without words can communicate deeply. The sounds are vibrations that our minds and bodies translate. When listening to a symphony by Beethoven, I can hear so many emotions being expressed – love, anger, longing, excitement. I can also imagine peace, beauty in nature, storms, a horse chase. Such music paints pictures in your mind, which then releases a flood of chemicals based on the emotion being experienced.

Music also communicates with your cells. When listening to a song using Tibetan singing bowls you are brought through an inner journey. Depending on the tones used, different energy centers in your body are woken up. These energy centers, known by some traditions as chakras, then vibrate to resonate with the tone, and to realign to its optimal condition.

I’m getting deep here – but if you understand the power of music to change one’s cells, then you have a key to healing.

While these are some of the major ways of communication, I’ve actually shared some grains of information that underlie some of the powerful ways of ancient healing. Can you see them?

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Check out my Next Workshop –“Dream Maker Life Alignment Course” – 4 weeks to realign your life and move forward on the path to create your dreams. Visit http://www.BaylanMegino.com and click on “Next Workshop” for less struggle and more peace in your life.


12 Days of Gratitude Day 1: Good Health:

12 Days of Gratitude: Day 1- Good Health

 

 

 

12 Days of Gratitude: Day 2 – Mobility

Today I am grateful for Mobility – in all its forms. Several years ago I had a mentor who had survived a broken back. She was immobile for months, and had to relearn how to use almost every muscle in her body. Being able to move her pinkie finger was a celebration.

That really puts our physical mobility into a different light, doesn’t it? On a few occasions I have felt my knees not ready to flex while going down the front stairs. That has immobilized me momentarily, because the pain was acute. With a few stretches and slight knee-bends, I was able to continue on my way. So our physical health and flexibility is key to our overall mobility.

Ask a chiropractor or physical therapist – they know all about the importance of flexibility and the body’s ability to respond with the level of comfort and strength needed.

12 Days of Gratitude Day 2 Mobility by Baylan Megino

12 Days of Gratitude Day 2 Mobility by Baylan Megino

We take so much of our mobility for granted.

Then after looking past my body and my ability to move it in any direction I choose, I then look at vehicles.

Something as simple as riding a bicycle takes coordination. AND the ability to afford/have a bike. For some, that is the first main challenge to being able to function beyond your immediate four walls.

Expand that ability to include driving a motorcycle/scooter, or the much larger car or truck, and you have the ability to travel farther and faster than possible in past centuries.

Today it is so easy to step outside, get into a car, and just go. Can you image not being able to travel with such ease?

Now with the recent rise of inexpensive car riding services, we don’t even have to own/lease/rent a car. In this Lyft-enabled / Uber-enabled world, where a waiting vehicle is only a phone call away, we can’t imagine not being able to travel quickly and relatively inexpensively.

In certain times when my movement has been limited by lack of access to a vehicle, it’s been very challenging to downshift and still get things done that I’ve needed to accomplish. Business appointments, grocery shopping, doctor appointments, general shopping – these all require traveling distances that are not easily covered on foot, much less with arms laden with full shopping bags.

Buses, light rail, and trains all work to move the masses where they need to be on schedule. Good public transportation systems are imperative to being able to make and keep appointments.

My mobility – whether personal or vehicular – is key to determining how my days are planned, and what in-person interactions will be possible. I can choose to stay at home, even to work at home, and still know that mobility is easily possible.

So much of my life relies on being able to go to the store on a moment’s notice, or transport people to appointments reliably, or to move back and forth with ease. To not be able to enjoy such mobility would be a totally different life – and not one I would look forward to each day.

Can you imagine what it’s like to suddenly be without a vehicle? Or without the ability to physically move easily? What might you decide to NOT do? How would your life change?

Perhaps I would change what I do. Definitely I would be forced to change HOW I do things. Everything would have to be planned out, and spontaneity would go out the window. On the other hand, maybe I would do less, and concentrate my time even more. I might even walk more – which could be a good thing!

Someday soon I will be making more such decisions – let’s just hope the decisions are by choice, and not out of necessity.

So today I am grateful for Mobility.

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Want 2018 to be the year you take control of your work and your personal life? Check out my next workshop at http://bit.ly/dmlaw201801


12 Days of Gratitude: Day 1- Good Health

 

12 Days of Gratitude Day 3: Communication

 

 

12 Days of Gratitude: Day 1- Good Health

12 Days of Gratitude came to me today as I was thinking of the song, “The 12 Days of Christmas.” While I’ve looked more toward the meaning behind the holiday traditions, I realized that the song related to the 12 days between December 25th and “Little Christmas,” 12 days later when it is celebrated that the 3 Kings arrived at Baby Jesus’ manger.

I started thinking about the gifts we are given in this life, and can be aware of especially at this time. To identify the 12, I’ve decided to be open to what will come, rather than preplanning the 12 days. The first one that came to mind is this: Good Health.

12 Days of Gratitude Day 1- Good Health by Baylan Megino

12 Days of Gratitude Day 1- Good Health by Baylan Megino

Looking around me, so many people are elderly, in ill health, or are managing life-altering conditions. I can only feel compassion for the daily battle they fight to keep as independent as possible.

As my grandmother used to say,

“But for the Grace of God go I.”

I am blessed and grateful to have good health today, and know I can do better with keeping in good physical shape. This is my temple, and in 2018 I intend to take better care of it.

So today I am grateful for Good Health.

 


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12 Days of Gratitude: Day 2 – Mobility

 

Gratitude Day 4: Fathers

On this 4th Day of Gratitude, I give thanks for my father, and all the fathers in the world.

Every day I walk by two places where my father’s watchful gaze is seen. Though he isn’t with us any longer, my memories are strong and inform my every interaction.

The Yang to Mother’s Yin

When I think of Dad, my memories are filled with how he showed up in the world – at home, at work, in the community, in organizations. Whether in public or in private quarters, my dad showed me how to interact one-on-one with whatever was in front of me.

Gratitude Day 4 Father by Baylan Megino

Gratitude Day 4 Father by Baylan Megino

Dads do that. They show us how to DO things – how to observe, analyze, plan and implement so that we can get the result we want.

They teach us how to think about our part in the whole. Sometimes we have to think of what is in the best interest of the greater good, and choose between our individual desires and what will be best “for all concerned.”

They show us the individual attitude needed to persevere in difficult times, as well as the way to step back and be part of a team while maintaining our individuality.

They also show us when to step aside.

It’s hard for me to write about being a dad.
I’ve never been a dad and never will be.

I can only share some of the images that I am grateful for that are indelibly etched in my memory:

  1. Watching Dad make a kite out of bamboo strips, then flying it in the Knights of Columbus kite-flying contest
  2. Fishing in the Ozarks and catching lots of bluegills
  3. His erect stance, with head slightly tilted, a smile curling up the edges of his mouth.
  4. His / My hands
  5. The way he called me “Girl” – only a handful of times
  6. Standing alone with him behind the church entry doors as the Love Theme from “Superman” began to play, he touched my arm, slightly raised his eyebrows, and gently asked, “Are you ready, girl?”
  7. His gentle touch
  8. His anger at injustice
  9. Playing chess after work with my aunt
  10. Wearing plumed hat, satin cape, and sword as Grand Knight and part of the Knights of Columbus Color Guard
  11. Dancing with all the widows and older single women, but Mom always had the last dance
  12. Baiting the hook and fishing at Berkeley Pier
  13. Smoking Kent cigarettes, the stick pursed between lips and tilted up so the ashes wouldn’t fall
  14. The glow of his cigarette in the dark as the trash mound burned
  15. Carrying Mom’s big camera case wherever they traveled
  16. Michelin Man
  17. Bowling with community groups
  18. Singing in the church choir
  19. Connecting with the land and its cycles at the almond orchard
  20. Planting green beans and tending to the garden every evening
  21. Opening envelopes by tearing off the end
  22. His joy on our first visit to the Philippines and pride in sharing his family
  23. Putting on the Igorot hat, squatting on the hillside and looking into the distance, cigarette held between his lips
  24. Fishing at Ocean Beach with the long ocean fishing poles
  25. Fishing derbies at Lake Chabot
  26. Dad with my cousin and his young male friends
  27. His willingness to try anything
  28. His mischievousness – climbing the statue at the St. Louis FANHS Convention
  29. Fixing the car
  30. Figuring out how to DO things
  31. Being

Like many, my relationship with my father was up and down. We were much alike, so eventually gave each other wide berth when needed. In those times, as now, those many memories gathered over the years kept us connected.

I am so very grateful for those memories. And for the man who made them and me possible.

Thank you, Dad.

Today, give thanks for your father. If you can, tell him. Even better, show him.

Blessings and peace,

Baylan

 

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Gratitude Day 3: Mother

On this third day of Gratitude, I give thanks for my Mother, and for all mothers in the world.

This morning as I woke up, sunlight was just peeking through the window. The house sildent, I heard my mother moving slowly in the next room.

Gratitude Day 3 Mother by Baylan Megino

Gratitude Day 3 Mother by Baylan Megino

How many times as an infant, I wondered, did I listen to her move through the rooms, the speed of her gait and volume of her sound communicating her feelings?

That is what mothers do. They are always present, whether physically or in our minds. They birth us, feed us, dress us, discipline us, tend to our every need. They teach us how to view and approach life, based on traditions, their experiences, and observations of the world. They shape our mental world and expectations, and guide our responses, defining right and wrong.

Even when we can provide for ourselves, mothers often still attempt to guide our thoughts.

It’s hard to stop being Mom.

Becoming a mother is a process sometimes eased by the shared wisdom from your own. It is in preparing to welcome your child that you understand the commitment required of a mother, a commitment made to ensure the continuation of life beyond our years.

A mother must give over her body to another being — for up to nine months she shares her breath, her blood, and her cells so that the baby can grow.,

She risks her health and her life in order that her child can come into the world. And once arrived, she must put many of her needs aside in order to focus on ensuring her child grows healthy, strong, and able to face the world in their own way.

As adults, our challenge is to remember to
keep in touch with our mothers,
even when life gets busy.

Especially when life gets busy.

As I get older, I’ve found that my mother has honed an uncanny intuition. Was she reading my mind before I even knew my thoughts?

At some point, the tables will turn, and children become caregivers for their parents. It is then that we must remember — EVERYTHING Mother did so that we could live, so we could thrive, so we could choose the path to walk and the life to live.

And in the toughest times, remember that someday, receiving care is where we shall each be. Hope that the care is given by someone who truly cares.

Giving gratitude for Mothers, and especially for My Mother. Thank you, Mom 🙂

Blessings, light and peace,

Baylan